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October is SIDS Awareness Month

SIDS is the sudden death of an infant less than 1 year of age that cannot be explained after a thorough investigation is conducted.  There are about 4,200 cases of sudden unexpected infant deaths per year in the United States, half are caused by SIDS.

There are certain things you can do to reduce the risk of SIDS.

  • Always place a baby on his or her back to sleep, for naps and at night, to reduce the risk of SIDS.
  • Use a firm sleep surface, covered by a fitted sheet, to reduce the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death.
  • Your baby should not sleep in an adult bed, on a couch, or on a chair alone, with you, or with anyone else.
  • Keep soft objects, toys, and loose bedding out of your baby’s sleep area.
  • To reduce the risk of SIDS, do not smoke during pregnancy, and do not smoke or allow smoking around your baby.
  • Breastfeed your baby to reduce the risk of SIDS.
  • Give your baby a dry pacifier that is not attached to a string for naps and at night to reduce the risk of SIDS.

To learn more about creating a safe sleeping environment, visit Safe to Sleep. http://www.nichd.nih.gov/sts/Pages/default.aspx

Bereavement Resources

If you or someone you know has experienced the loss of a baby, the following organizations may offer support.

Newborn Safety

Newborn Car Safety Restraint

When your child leaves the hospital, his or her first ride must be a safe ride in a car seat. The car seat must be set in the rear facing position. A rear facing car seat must not be in a seat where the air bag may deploy.

By the time a child is one year old, weighs 20 pounds and is sitting well unsupported, the car seat may be faced forward.

According to the Arkansas Child Passenger Protection Act, which was approved February 28, 2001, a child should remain restrained in a child passenger safety seat until the child is approximately 60 pounds or about six years of age, then a safety belt is sufficient to meet the requirements of the law.

A rear facing car seat must not be in a seat where the air bag may deploy. This is very dangerous.

Crib Safety

Crib side rails should always be kept up when the infant is unattended. Crib bumpers are recommended. The distance between crib slats should be less than 2-3/8 inches. You should avoid toys and mobiles with long strings, cradle gyms that are not securely suspended and small objects in the crib. Do not place crib near a window with blinds.

Newborn Accident Prevention

  • Never leave your infant alone with young siblings or pets.
  • Your water heater thermostat should be set at 120 degrees Fahrenheit or less. This is a little below the normal setting.
  • Never leave your infant alone on a bed or other surface from which he/she may roll off.
  • Never leave your infant alone in a house or in a car unattended.
  • Do not shake or jiggle your baby’s head vigorously.
  • Infant jewelry such as earrings, necklaces, rings or other types of jewelry are not recommended.
  • Do not drink hot liquids or smoke cigarettes while holding your child because you could burn your child.
  • Do not use an infant feeder to feed your child baby food or semi-solid food because of the risk of choking and aspiration of food into the trachea.
  • All infants should sleep on their back or side to lessen the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

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October is SIDS Awareness Month

SIDS is the sudden death of an infant less than 1 year of age that cannot be explained after a thorough investigation is conducted.  There are about 4,200 cases of sudden unexpected infant deaths per year in the United States, half are caused by SIDS.

There are certain things you can do to reduce the risk of SIDS.

  • Always place a baby on his or her back to sleep, for naps and at night, to reduce the risk of SIDS.
  • Use a firm sleep surface, covered by a fitted sheet, to reduce the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death.
  • Your baby should not sleep in an adult bed, on a couch, or on a chair alone, with you, or with anyone else.
  • Keep soft objects, toys, and loose bedding out of your baby’s sleep area.
  • To reduce the risk of SIDS, do not smoke during pregnancy, and do not smoke or allow smoking around your baby.
  • Breastfeed your baby to reduce the risk of SIDS.
  • Give your baby a dry pacifier that is not attached to a string for naps and at night to reduce the risk of SIDS.

To learn more about creating a safe sleeping environment, visit Safe to Sleep. http://www.nichd.nih.gov/sts/Pages/default.aspx

Bereavement Resources

If you or someone you know has experienced the loss of a baby, the following organizations may offer support.

Newborn Safety

Newborn Car Safety Restraint

When your child leaves the hospital, his or her first ride must be a safe ride in a car seat. The car seat must be set in the rear facing position. A rear facing car seat must not be in a seat where the air bag may deploy.

By the time a child is one year old, weighs 20 pounds and is sitting well unsupported, the car seat may be faced forward.

According to the Arkansas Child Passenger Protection Act, which was approved February 28, 2001, a child should remain restrained in a child passenger safety seat until the child is approximately 60 pounds or about six years of age, then a safety belt is sufficient to meet the requirements of the law.

A rear facing car seat must not be in a seat where the air bag may deploy. This is very dangerous.

Crib Safety

Crib side rails should always be kept up when the infant is unattended. Crib bumpers are recommended. The distance between crib slats should be less than 2-3/8 inches. You should avoid toys and mobiles with long strings, cradle gyms that are not securely suspended and small objects in the crib. Do not place crib near a window with blinds.

Newborn Accident Prevention

  • Never leave your infant alone with young siblings or pets.
  • Your water heater thermostat should be set at 120 degrees Fahrenheit or less. This is a little below the normal setting.
  • Never leave your infant alone on a bed or other surface from which he/she may roll off.
  • Never leave your infant alone in a house or in a car unattended.
  • Do not shake or jiggle your baby’s head vigorously.
  • Infant jewelry such as earrings, necklaces, rings or other types of jewelry are not recommended.
  • Do not drink hot liquids or smoke cigarettes while holding your child because you could burn your child.
  • Do not use an infant feeder to feed your child baby food or semi-solid food because of the risk of choking and aspiration of food into the trachea.
  • All infants should sleep on their back or side to lessen the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).