Cotton Swabs

Cotton-tipped swabs are not meant to be placed in ears. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, the best thing to do with earwax is leave it alone. Trying to remove earwax can cause problems.

Putting cotton-tipped swabs into the ear canal pushes wax further into the ear. It can cause damages, dizziness, and balance problems. A child whose earwax is blocking the ear may have ringing or fullness, ear pain, itching, discharge, odor, and cough. Swabs also may tear or rupture the eardrum causing pain, bleeding, and permanent hearing loss.

For more information on earwax, please visit the HealthChildren.org.

Fever Medication

Every year hundreds of infants receive more than the recommended dose of  Tylenol for age. Rarely, these overdoses can cause liver failure or death. The overdoses are most likely related to dosing too frequently- that is more than every 6 hours AND from parents using two products that BOTH contain acetaminophen

e American Academy of Pediatrics does NOT recommend cough or cold medications for children under the age of two unless they are ordered by a physician.

Do not use codeine, tramadol in children: FDA

by Melissa Jenco · News Content Editor American Academy of Pediatrics News

Codeine and tramadol should not be used to treat pain or cough in children younger than 12 years as they could be fatal, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said Thursday.
The FDA unveiled several changes to the labels of the medications to protect children, adolescents and infants being breastfed.

“We are requiring these changes because we know that some children who received codeine or tramadol have experienced life-threatening respiratory depression and death because they metabolize (or break down) these medicines much faster than usual (called ultra-rapid metabolism), causing dangerously high levels of active drug in their bodies,” Douglas Throckmorton, M.D., deputy center director for regulatory programs in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement.

The FDA is adding the following new restrictions to the warning labels of codeine and tramadol:

  • Codeine is contraindicated to treat pain or cough, and tramadol is contraindicated for treating pain in children under 12.
  • Tramadol is contraindicated for treating pain after surgery to remove tonsils and/or adenoids for children under 18. Use of codeine for this purpose was placed under the same restriction in 2013.
  • Codeine and tramadol are not recommended for use in adolescents ages 12-18 who are obese or have conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea or severe lung disease.
  • Mothers should not breastfeed when taking codeine or tramadol.

Since 1969, codeine has been linked to 64 cases of serious breathing problems, including 24 deaths in children and adolescents. Tramadol is not approved for pediatric use but has been tied to nine cases of serious breathing problems, including three deaths in children and adolescents, according to the FDA. There also have been cases of breathing problems in breastfed infants whose mothers were taking codeine.

In September 2016, the Academy released a clinical report Codeine: Time to Say “No” that expressed concerns about the dangers of codeine use in children and called for more formal restrictions.
The FDA recommends physicians use other medications for treating cough and pain. Officials also encouraged parents to pay close attention to the ingredients in medication they give their children and seek immediate medical attention if children taking the restricted medications experience difficulty breathing, confusion, unusual sleepiness, trouble breastfeeding or limpness.

Resources

FDA Drug Safety Communication http://bit.ly/2or5PHZ
FDA Q&A on the use of codeine and tramadol in breastfeeding women, http://bit.ly/2pjylz2
Consumer Update: Codeine and Tramadol Can Cause Breathing Problems for Children, http://bit.ly/2pWK2b8
Healthychildren.org information for parents on the use of codeine, http://bit.ly/2ovoQrL

Hungry or Bored?

Children sometimes use food for reasons other than hunger to satisfy themselves.  These reasons may be in response to their emotions or feelings.  Many things can trigger hunger such as:

  • boredom
  • depression
  • stress
  • frustration
  • insecurity
  • loneliness
  • fatigue

One way to keep your child from eating out of boredom is to steer them towards activities that keep them busy.  Also make sure your child eats three well-balanced meals and one snack each day.

A few things to do instead of eating would be:

  • walk the dog
  • walk around the neighborhood
  • kicking a ball around
  • painting a picture
  • running through sprinklers

Dog Bite Prevention Week

May 15-22, 2016 is Dog Bite Prevention Week®.

Each year, more than 4.5 million people in the US are bitten by dogs. Of the 800,000 who seek medication attention, half are children.

Since most dog bites involve familiar animals, prevention starts at the home.

The American Pediatric Association gives the following tips on preventing dog bites:

  • Almost 1 in 5 people bitten by dogs require medical attention. For children, the injuries are more likely to be serious. Parents should be aware of some simple steps that can prevent dog bites.
  • Never leave a small child and a dog alone together, no matter if it is the family dog, a dog that is known to you, or a dog that you have been assured is well behaved. Any dog can bite.
  • Do not allow your child to play aggressive games with a dog, such as tug-of-war or wrestling, as this can lead to bites.
  • Teach your child to ask a dog owner for permission before petting any dog.
  • Let a dog sniff you or your child before petting, and stay away from the face or tail. Pet the dog gently, and avoid eye contact, particularly at first.
  • Never bother a dog that is sleeping, eating, or caring for puppies. Dogs in these situations are more likely to respond aggressively, even with a person who is familiar to them.
  • Do not allow your child to run past a dog, because dogs may be tempted to pursue the child.
  • Teach your child that if a dog is behaving in a threatening manner—for example, growling and barking—to remain calm, avoid eye contact with the dog, and back away slowly until the dog loses interest and leaves.
  • If you or your child is knocked over by a dog, curl up in a ball and protect the eyes and face with arms and fists.

For more information and what to do if a dog bites your child, visit healthychildren.org.

Infant Safety Classes

Unfortunately, babies do not come with directions! It is our job as parents to keep them safe. The Children’s Clinic would like to see how many parents would be interested in a child safety class that include topics such as:  CPR, sleeping positions, SIDS, and car seat safety.

If interested, please fill out the form below. You will be contact should we decide to offer a class like this.

Poison Prevention Week

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National Poison Prevention Week is March 16 – 22, 2014.

An estimated 90,000 children are treated in emergency rooms nationwide and about 30 die each year due to poison-related incidents. The good news, many of these poison-related incidents are preventable.

The first step in prevention is identifying poison danger. Nine out of ten times unintentional poisoning incidents occure in the home, and many involve commonly used medicines and household chemicals.  Simple steps such as keeping products in original containers, properly sealed after each use and stored up and away and out of child’s reach and sight can go a long way in preventing unintentional exposure. It is also important to know what to do in case of exposure.

For more information about poison awareness, download 50+ Poisoning Prevention Tips.

You can also like the Poison Prevent Week Council on Facebook or follow the hashtag #PreventPoison on twitter.

The Arkansas Poison Center’s website by The University of Arkanasas for Medical Sciences College of Pharmacy also has more information and a section to order free materials for your home.