Front facing or Rear facing car seat?

Front facing or rear facing? Which one is the best?  When a child is placed front facing in the car seat injuries can be more severe.  This is because during a collision the child’s neck can be thrown forward, creating a stress on the spinal cord.  The spinal cord is very important and even the slightest damage can cause tremendous injuries, such as paralysis or even death.  When a child is rear facing in a car seat their bodies are cradled, supporting the head and neck securely. This keeps the head, neck, and spine fully aligned.  The longer a child can ride in the rear facing position, the better protected his or her spinal cord will be in a collision.    

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From TV to smartphones to social media, our lives are dominated by 24/7 media exposure. Despite this, many children and teens have few rules around their media use. Parents, help your children balance their online and […]

Create Your Family’s Media Use Plan!

From TV to smartphones to social media, our lives are dominated by 24/7 media exposure. Despite this, many children and teens have few rules around their media use.
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Thanksgiving can be challenging for parents with picky eaters.  With a little planning, you can create a balanced Thanksgiving meal the whole family will enjoy.  Here are some tips to […]

How to Plan a Balanced Thanksgiving Meal for Picky Eaters

Thanksgiving can be challenging for parents with picky eaters.  With a little planning, you can create a balanced Thanksgiving meal the whole family will enjoy.  Here are some tips to please your picky eaters without straying from Thanksgiving traditions or creating a lot of extra work.

  • Choose at least one food you know your child will like.
  • Engage your child in meal planning.
  • Engage your child in meal prep.
  • Use food bridges.
  • Make it look, smell, and taste delicious.
  • Keep the mealtime relaxing and enjoyable.

 

 

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[av_textblock size=” font_color=” color=”] Insect repellents come in many forms, including aerosols, sprays, liquids, creams, and sticks. Some are made from chemicals and some have natural ingredients. Insect repellents prevent […]

Choosing an Insect Repellent

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Insect repellents come in many forms, including aerosols, sprays, liquids, creams, and sticks. Some are made from chemicals and some have natural ingredients.

Insect repellents prevent bites from biting insects but not stinging insects. Biting insects include mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, chiggers, and biting flies. Stinging insects include bees, hornets, and wasps.
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[av_row row_style=’avia-heading-row’][av_cell col_style=”]What’s Available
[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]How Well It Works[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]How Long it Protects[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]Special Precautions

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[av_row row_style=”][av_cell col_style=”]Chemical repellents with DEET
(N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide)[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]Considered the best defense against biting insects. [/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]About 2 to 5 hours depending on the concentration of DEET in the product.

[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]Caution should be used when applying DEET to children.

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[av_row row_style=”][av_cell col_style=”]Picaridin[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]In April 2005 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended other repellents that may work as well as DEET: repellents with picaridin and repellents with oil of lemon eucalyptus or 2% soybean oil. Currently these products have a duration of action that is comparable to that of about 10% DEET.[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]About 3 to 8 hours depending on the concentration.[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]Although these products are considered safe when used as recommended, long-term follow-up studies are not available. Also, more studies need to be done to see how well they repel ticks.

Allergic reactions are rare, but can occur when using repellents made from essential oils.[/av_cell][/av_row]
[av_row row_style=”][av_cell col_style=”]Repellents made from essential oils found in plants such as citronella, cedar, eucalyptus, and soybean[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]In April 2005 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended other repellents that may work as well as DEET: repellents with picaridin and repellents with oil of lemon eucalyptus or 2% soybean oil. Currently these products have a duration of action that is comparable to that of about 10% DEET.[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]Usually less than 2 hours.[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]Although these products are considered safe when used as recommended, long-term follow-up studies are not available. Also, more studies need to be done to see how well they repel ticks.

Allergic reactions are rare, but can occur when using repellents made from essential oils.[/av_cell][/av_row]
[av_row row_style=”][av_cell col_style=”]Chemical repellents with permethrin [/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]These repellents kill ticks on contact.

[/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]When applied to clothing, it lasts even after several washings. [/av_cell][av_cell col_style=”]Should only be applied to clothing, not directly to skin. May be applied to outdoor equipment such as sleeping bags or tents

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Read more about types of repellents and the dos and donts for children.
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Congratulations to Dr. Jane Sneed for winning the Jonesboro Occasions Readers’ Choice Award for Best Pedatrician. Also congrats to Dr. Kevin Rouse for winning Finalist in the Jonesboro Occasions Readers’ Choice […]

Jonesboro Occasions Readers’ Choice Award Best Pediatrician

Congratulations to Dr. Jane Sneed for winning the Jonesboro Occasions Readers’ Choice Award for Best Pedatrician. Also congrats to Dr. Kevin Rouse for winning Finalist in the Jonesboro Occasions Readers’ Choice Award for Best Pedatrician. The Children’s Clinic is fortunate to have you both on our team!

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When possible, dress yourself and your kids in cool, comfortable clothing that covers the body, like lightweight cotton pants, long-sleeved shirts, and hats. Use a sunscreen with an SPF (sun […]

Sunscreen

Cute baby girl applying sun screen lotion for safe tan and skin care

  • When possible, dress yourself and your kids in cool, comfortable clothing that covers the body, like lightweight cotton pants, long-sleeved shirts, and hats.
  • Use a sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection factor) of at least 15. The higher the SPF, the more UVB protection the sunscreen has.
  • For babies older than 6 months. Apply to all areas of the body, but be careful around the eyes. If your baby rubs sunscreen into her eyes, wipe the eyes and hands clean with a damp cloth. If the sunscreen irritates her skin, try a different brand or try a sunscreen stick or sunscreen or sunblock with titanium dioxide or zinc oxide. If a rash develops, talk with your child’s doctor.

For More Information on Tips about Sunscreen check out the link below.

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-play/Pages/Sun-Safety.aspx

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The Prevnar vaccine was first introduced in 2000, and has been modified several times. The most recent is called the Prevnar 13 and is administered at 2, 4, 6, and […]

About Prevnar-13

The Prevnar vaccine was first introduced in 2000, and has been modified several times. The most recent is called the Prevnar 13 and is administered at 2, 4, 6, and 12-15 months.  It protects against a bacteria called Streptococcal pneumoniae , which can cause anything from ear infections to more serious infections like pneumonia, bacteremia or blood infections, and meningitis or infections of the brain and spinal cord. It’s easily spread from person to person, and children under 2 yrs of age and adults older then 65 yrs of age are most susceptible to this infection.

Before this vaccine was available, this bacteria caused 5 million ear infections, 13,000 blood infections, and 700 cases of meningitis and 200 pediatric deaths a year. Of those that survived the meningitis, a significant number of them were deaf or neurologically devastated. See link from a family who want to show others what this horrible disease can do to a child.

Outcome

Since the Prevnar vaccine hit the market, the diseases caused by this bacteria have been reduced 88%. The disease this vaccine prevents can be so aggressive and horrible, that it’s hard to understand why anyone would conceivably put their child at risk by not vaccinating.

This post and attempt at education is done in memory of those families who lost a normal and healthy child to this horrible disease, either through death or from neurological devastation. They did not have the opportunity to vaccinate their child, but you do!

Below is a video of a family with a child living with Pneumococcal Meningitis.

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