Do you have a bee sting? If you only have a sting site reaction , a cold compress or an ice pack should be enough treatment. For pain, take aspirin […]

Treating Bee Stings

Do you have a bee sting?

If you only have a sting site reaction , a cold compress or an ice pack should be enough treatment.

For pain, take aspirin or acetaminophen. Don’t give aspirin to a child under age 19 because of the risk of Reye’s syndrome, which affects the liver and brain.

Try diphenhydramine or another nonprescription antihistamine that can calm the itch. Or you can use an over-the-counter steroid cream.

Although most people do not experience severe reactions to bee stings, it’s a good idea to keep an eye on anyone who has been stung in case they develop more serious symptoms.

If you notice any signs of an allergic reaction, or if you or someone you know has been stung multiple times – particularly if he or she is a child – Call 911 and seek medical attention immediately.

 

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Bon Voyage to the Skaugs

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We would like to congratulate Dr. Warren Skaug and Dr. Phyllis Skaug on their retirement. Dr. Warren Skaug has been with the clinic for 38 years. Dr. Phyllis Skaug has been with the clinic 32 years. They are going to be missed by the staff and their patients.
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Vicki has been Dr. Warren Skaug’s nurse for the whole 38 years he has been at the clinic.
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Kathy has been Dr. Phyllis Skaug’s nurse for the past 4 years.
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THE SAFETY OF OUR PATIENTS, STAFF, AND PROVIDERS ALWAYS COME FIRST! The Children’s Clinic rarely closes completely during inclement weather. We evaluate the roads at 6:30am the morning of and […]

Inclement Weather Policy

THE SAFETY OF OUR PATIENTS, STAFF, AND PROVIDERS ALWAYS COME FIRST!

The Children’s Clinic rarely closes completely during inclement weather. We evaluate the roads at 6:30am the morning of and decide on clinic hours.

Our Walk-in Clinic will be open during the clinic hours for that day. If your provider is unable to make the drive, you may be seen in our Walk-in Clinic.

Please watch our facebook page for special hours.

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Cotton Swabs

Cotton-tipped swabs are not meant to be placed in ears. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, the best thing to do with earwax is leave it alone. Trying to remove earwax can cause problems.

Putting cotton-tipped swabs into the ear canal pushes wax further into the ear. It can cause damages, dizziness, and balance problems. A child whose earwax is blocking the ear may have ringing or fullness, ear pain, itching, discharge, odor, and cough. Swabs also may tear or rupture the eardrum causing pain, bleeding, and permanent hearing loss.

For more information on earwax, please visit the HealthChildren.org.

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Every year hundreds of infants receive more than the recommended dose of  Tylenol for age. Rarely, these overdoses can cause liver failure or death. The overdoses are most likely related […]

Fever Medication

Every year hundreds of infants receive more than the recommended dose of  Tylenol for age. Rarely, these overdoses can cause liver failure or death. The overdoses are most likely related to dosing too frequently- that is more than every 6 hours AND from parents using two products that BOTH contain acetaminophen

e American Academy of Pediatrics does NOT recommend cough or cold medications for children under the age of two unless they are ordered by a physician.

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While for the majority of children fever is not an emergency- there are a certain group of children that fever is considered dangerous. Think of the Three I’s Think of the […]

When Is a Fever an Emergency?

While for the majority of children fever is not an emergency- there are a certain group of children that fever is considered dangerous. Think of the Three I’s

Think of the Three I’s

  • Immune compromised– children that do not have a well working immune system cannot fight off infection and therefore when they have fever they need to see their healthcare professional immediately
  • Immunization– babies less than two months of age are at higher risk for bacterial infection and if your child has not had his 2-month vaccines and has a temperature over 100 degrees rectally you should consider this a medical emergency and go directly to the emergency department
  • Intake– having a fever WILL make your child uncomfortable- especially if it is over 102.  Often this leads to poor drinking and if your child cannot drink enough they may become dehydrated. If you think your child might be dehydrated due to fever then bring them to see the doctor immediately.
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For parents, doctors and pharmacy companies, fever has been thought to be “the enemy”. We should be scared of fever and make it go away as fast as possible. This […]

Fever is Good – Most of the Time

For parents, doctors and pharmacy companies, fever has been thought to be “the enemy”. We should be scared of fever and make it go away as fast as possible. This may be a very dangerous idea for the following reasons.

Fever Facts

  • All animals, even single cell organisms, have fever. Therefore it is felt to be important in protecting us in some way.
  • Studies show that increasing the body temperature decreases the ability of bacteria to multiply and spread. That gives antibiotics a chance to work faster.
  • Newer studies also show that the increase in body temperature activates a special kind of white blood cells- aptly named “killer T cells”. The activation of these killers means that your body can fight virus infections better and may be the only “treatment” needed for getting rid of the most common form of infection.

Therefore- not letting your body have a fever when you have an infection may actually make the virus last longer and take the antibiotics longer to work for bacteria infections.

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