Growth Charts

Father checking daughters height against the wall

Growth charts consist of a series of percentile curves that illustrate the distribution of selected body measurements in children. Pediatric growth charts have been used by pediatricians, nurses, and parents to track the growth of infants, children, and adolescents in the United States since 1977.

CDC recommends that health care providers:

Growth charts are not intended to be used as a sole diagnostic instrument. Instead, growth charts are tools that contribute to forming an overall clinical impression for the child being measured.

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By. Dr. Warren Skaug As if parents didn’t have enough to worry about, here comes a new potentially serious infection to threaten our children. Enterovirus D68 has been in the […]

Enterovirus D68 and Children

By. Dr. Warren Skaug

As if parents didn’t have enough to worry about, here comes a new potentially serious infection to threaten our children. Enterovirus D68 has been in the news almost daily for the past several weeks, it seems to be spreading throughout the country, including Arkansas, so it might be helpful to have a little information about this virus from your doctor’s perspective.

First, you need to know that enteroviruses are a big family of viruses that commonly pass child-to-child in the Summer and Fall of the year. Most members of this family of germs cause acute illnesses that make kids miserable but resolve on their own over several days. They cause various symptoms from fever to runny nose to sore throat to diarrhea, and sometimes skin rashes (including Hand-Foot-Mouth disease). There is no real cure or vaccine for these illnesses; they go away on their own. Among these many virus strains, the D68 variety was rarely seen in the past, but for some reason that strain has become a very big problem this year.

Enterovirus D68 appears to cause just cold symptoms initially and is impossible to distinguish early on from any number of not-so-bad respiratory viruses. However, in many children, especially those who have asthma, the illness progresses to respiratory distress lasting several days, often requiring hospitalization to manage. In recent days, there have been frightening reports of arm and leg muscle weakness during the recovery phase in some of these patients, and it is not yet clear whether all children will recover from that complication.

From your doctor’s perspective, this is a nightmare. Every day, we see a great many children with cold symptoms caused by the usual harmless viruses around us. We can’t pick out the very few who will potentially develop severe breathing distress over the following few days. Also, the specific test for Enterovirus D68 (yes, there is one) is not readily available to physicians around the country. Nasal swab samples have to be sent to the Arkansas Department of Health and then to the CDC in Atlanta, GA to be analyzed, and they are only accepted from hospitalized patients. Another thorny issue is that there is no specific treatment – just the supportive care we might give to any patient with respiratory distress – oxygen if they need it, breathing treatments, and close watching.

From a parent’s perspective, here’s what you can do: Enteroviruses are spread through secretions (snot, saliva, stool). Just employing good hand washing and cleanliness at home can reduce their spread. Good day care centers typically know this and employ those practices. If your child gets sick with runny nose and cough, he/she should be treated for a routine cold because that’s probably what it is. But also closely watch for onset of wheezing or breathing distress over the following few days and get to your health care provider if those occur. You may depend on us to consider the possibility of Enterovirus D68 as we evaluate your child.

Thankfully, so far, illness from this virus appears uncommon in Arkansas, but we are on guard for a possible increase over the next several weeks. We are waiting, just as you, are for more information about its spread, for better diagonstic and treatment options, and hopefully, for its prevalence to eventually decrease as the Winter season gets here.

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Amber Sloan, APRN has been a part of The Children’s Clinic family for 9 wonderful years, however she will be moving to The Pain Center with Dr. Savu.  She will […]

Amber Sloan

Amber Sloan, APRN has been a part of The Children’s Clinic family for 9 wonderful years, however she will be moving to The Pain Center with Dr. Savu.  She will be greatly missed by The Children’s Clinic, her patients, and her patient’s families.  We wish her the best in her endeavors.

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Unfortunately, babies do not come with directions! It is our job as parents to keep them safe. The Children’s Clinic would like to see how many parents would be interested […]

Infant Safety Classes

Unfortunately, babies do not come with directions! It is our job as parents to keep them safe. The Children’s Clinic would like to see how many parents would be interested in a child safety class that include topics such as:  CPR, sleeping positions, SIDS, and car seat safety.

If interested, please fill out the form below. You will be contact should we decide to offer a class like this.

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The Children’s Clinic is sponsoring Kids on the Mile, August 23, 2014 from 8am to 11am at the St. Bernards Auditorium. The event will have entertainment, fun activities, and give-a-ways. […]

Kids on the Mile

The Children’s Clinic is sponsoring Kids on the Mile, August 23, 2014 from 8am to 11am at the St. Bernards Auditorium.

The event will have entertainment, fun activities, and give-a-ways. There will also be a 2 mile fun run. You can register for the fun run at www.racesonline.com.

For more information, please contact St. Bernards Foundation at 870-207-2500 or email kbobbit@sbrmc.org.

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Are you having trouble getting your children to do their chores? You should an the ChoreMonster app that was recommended by one of our parents. ChoreMonster is a app available […]

ChoreMonster App

Are you having trouble getting your children to do their chores? You should an the ChoreMonster app that was recommended by one of our parents. ChoreMonster is a app available online, or for your iPhone or Windows phone.

How does it work?

For parents, you can quickly schedule chores to be done with point values. When your child says they are done, you approve and then they get their points. Add rewards that your kids can “purchase” from their point collection. A reward can be anything from a fun activity, money, gift, or camping trip.

For kids, they sign into the ChoreMonster mobile or web app that is easy to navigate for kids. They will see their chores for the day. Once they have completed the chore, they mark it with a “thumbs up”. They can save up their points for a reward. After each chore they also get to spin the wheel that gives new monsters for them to collect.

Visit them online for more information. You can also see the screen shots below to see inside the app.

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Penicillin Allergy

Question: If you were allergic to Penicillin as a child, can you outgrow it?

Answer: Yes, children usually do outgrow it. It’s important to note, however, that most children who are thought to have the allergy by their parents actually do not (when tested by an allergist). An even higher percentage – perhaps 80 to 90 percent – of adults who think they are allergic to Penicillin are incorrect. As a result, instead of tried and true Penicillin, they usually end up with a broad-spectrum antibiotic that’s not only more expensive but may have more side effects and be less effective. If you think you are allergic to Penicillin, you can be tested by an allergist to confirm it.

Excerpt from: University of California, Berkeley Wellness Letter Special Spring/Summer Issues 2014.

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